I’m scatter-brained, I talk too much, and although people generally like me I’m never really the guy that gets picked first for teams in gym class.  I could hang out with people in the “cool” crowd but I was never one of them.

I didn’t have an unhappy childhood, in fact it was pretty great.  I have a great mom who worked hard to provide for my brother and I.  My step dad was a better Dad than most people’s “real” dad.  I couldn’t have chosen better parents and even though my brother and I fought like most siblings, he’s pretty great too.  But all of this doesn’t erase the fact that I have a past.

My previous post from earlier this week, “Check Your Baggage” was about the importance recognizing we all have baggage and that it may not be all bad, but that it all needs to be dealt with on some level.  So in this post I wanted to talk about 3 ways we can address the baggage in our life.

baggage-check

 Don’t pack it in the first place 

Now days with all the extra fees the airlines are charging checking baggage can be expensive.  So if you don’t need it don’t pack it.  The same goes for life.  There are some things from our past that we need and some things we don’t.  When traveling we talk to others that have been to our destination or a travel agent in order to determine what we should pack and when it comes to emotional baggage we can do the same thing by talking to a counselor or therapist.  They can help us sort through our “junk” and help us what we need and what we can leave behind.

 TSA Checkpoints

Once you’ve gotten packed and made it to the airport the TSA is also going to want to rummage through your stuff as well.  Stretching the metaphor of travel a little bit thinner, think of this as second trip to the counselor.  Often times we think we can be “healed” by a therapist in a single visit.  Dealing with our baggage is not just a one time event, it is an ongoing exercise.  The reason for the TSA is to make sure that nothing in your baggage is going hurt you or the other passengers on board.  So when you look at it from this perspective isn’t that basically what we are asking a counselor to help us do as well?

 Overhead Compartments

 If you’ve ever ridden on an airplane there is always at least one person trying to jam a duffle bag the size and weight of a dead body in one of the overhead compartments.  They are obviously struggling with it and all the other passengers just sit there and watch (and mutter under their breath) without helping.  I’ve found one of the best ways to make travel a little more enjoyable is helping others deal with their baggage and make their trip  comfortable and enjoyable as well.  You may not be a therapist but you can always be a listening ear or a shoulder to cry on.  If you’ve gained their trust maybe you can even recommend a travel agent.. er.. counselor.

We are just about ready for take off.  We’ve got our carry-ons under our seats and our seat backs and tray tables are in the upright and lock position.  We’ve watched the safety video and our seat belts or fastened.  I have some more thoughts to wrap up this discussion on baggage  but until my next post I’ll leave you with these 3 questions.  What’s in your baggage, are you sure it needs to be there, and who are you helping with their baggage?

brad.schmidt@bradschmidt.netUncategorized
I’m scatter-brained, I talk too much, and although people generally like me I’m never really the guy that gets picked first for teams in gym class.  I could hang out with people in the “cool” crowd but I was never one of them. I didn’t have an unhappy childhood, in...